strathspey Archive: Dance Teachers Pain...

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Dance Teachers Pain...

Message 12387 · REBECCA SAGER · 20 Jun 1998 23:03:59 · Top

Just a comment, not on the dance but the suggested music - The Perth
Medley. Every few months we have another go at a dance we learned at a
Titusville (Florida) workshop from George Senyk of the Orlando Branch -
The Dutch Crossing - which is danced to this medley. It is a dance
involving eight couples and a rotation through 90 degrees at the end of
each repeat and is a total blast when (if) it works out. George claims to
have adapted it from a (contra?) dance he learned in Holland. The Orlando
Branch published it in a collection in early 1991.

Becky
--
Becky Sager,
Marietta GA USA
http://www.mindspring.com/~atlbrnch

Dance Teachers Pain...

Message 12407 · SallenNic · 22 Jun 1998 20:36:02 · Top

"Dutch Crossing" (no definite article) is an English Country Dance by a
Dutchman, Ernst van Brakel. It was devised to go to the tune "The Merry Lads
of Ayr" (RSCDS Book I) and is danced in its country of origin to Jimmy Shand's
recording of the dance. The step used is the usual smooth "English dance
walk", although there would seem to be little reason why it should not be done
to a skip change of step, if "English dance walk" were a problem
The instructions are published in "Dances with a Difference 3", by and
available from Colin Hume. However, in that book he also published a tune he
had composed for the dance; the Dutch, however, greatly prefer to dance it to
the tune Ernst intended.
Colin's tune is available recorded on "Dutch Crossing", a CD by Wild Thyme
containing 15 English style Country Dances, mostly by of Dutch origin: There
is an optional booklet, containing full instructions for all the dances,
available with the CD.
CD and booklet are almost certainly available from CDSS in the USA, from
Cotswold Music Society in GB, and from NVS Vereniging in the Netherlands.
One small footnote to all this: the Dutch always call English Country Dances
"English Contra Dances"!
Nicolas Broadbridge, Lanark, Scotland.

Dance Teachers Pain...

Message 12415 · Anselm Lingnau · 23 Jun 1998 10:36:23 · Top

SallenNic@aol.com writes:

> although there would seem to be little reason why [Dutch Crossing] should
> not be done to a skip change of step, if "English dance walk" were a
> problem

We do that here. It works fine. The problems are really more in
deciding where to go next :^)

I think there is considerable scope for dances that involve two standard
sets side by side. As far as I'm aware this hasn't been tried a lot
(there is one of the MacNab dances whose name escapes me just now which
uses the idea, but other than that I don't remember anything being done
with it. So many ideas, so little time ...).

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Hardware: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked. --- Jeff Pesis

Dance Teachers Pain...

Message 12437 · M.J.Norman · 24 Jun 1998 14:42:11 · Top

>I think there is considerable scope for dances that involve two standard
>sets side by side. As far as I'm aware this hasn't been tried a lot
>(there is one of the MacNab dances whose name escapes me just now which
>uses the idea, but other than that I don't remember anything being done
>with it. So many ideas, so little time ...).

Connie, maybe you can help me out with this one. Didn't our dem team do
something with just three lines of four people, the middle line taking part
in the two dances going on simultaneously? I can't remember which dances
they were, but I know it worked- and it was great fun.

Monica

Dance Teachers Pain...

Message 12451 · John Chambers · 25 Jun 1998 05:42:44 · Top

| >I think there is considerable scope for dances that involve two standard
| >sets side by side. As far as I'm aware this hasn't been tried a lot
| >(there is one of the MacNab dances whose name escapes me just now which
| >uses the idea, but other than that I don't remember anything being done
| >with it. So many ideas, so little time ...).

Such "double quadrilles" or "double contras" are rather common in the
northern German (including Dutch, Friedisch, and Danish) traditions.
One is well-known in International dance circles here in America: The
Heilsberger Dreieck. There are a lot of others. What they all tend to
have in common is at least one (and usually two) figures that involve
four couples in a square or circle formation. The progression figure
is usually up or down your own line, so the lines don't interact
during the progression. (I'd bet that someone has worked out a dance
in which the progression moves you up/down by one and also crosses
you over to the other line, but I've never seen it.)

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