strathspey Archive: Killer programme (was Killer dance advice sought)

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Killer programme (was Killer dance advice sought)

Message 11556 · The_Healys · 9 Apr 1998 01:15:28 · Top

Greetings!

Having treated Missie's penultimate posting a little dismissively,
Marilyn and I have just spent a pleasant evening over dinner
composing a reply to the latest request for a killer programme.
Missie's pre-condition that the "target" is a good dancer makes it
easier in one way in that the Strathspeys automatically become
demanding and enlisting the aid of the band leader to slightly
SLOW the strathspeys and SPEED UP the jigs and reels would
certainly help in achieving the objective.

The suggested programme was done without any assistance from
indices or databases but improvements are welcome:

Petronella (Reel 8 x 32 - no warm up or Grand March)
Braes of Breadalbane (S'pey 8 x 32)
Airdrie Lassies (Jig 4 x 48 repeated)
The Moving Cloud (Reel 8 x 32)
The Silver Tassie (S'pey 8 x 32)
Clutha (Hornpipe 4 x 48 repeated)
Macdonald of Sleat (Jig 1 x 120 repeated at least once)
Courage Reel (Reel 8 x 48)
The Bonniest Lass in all the World (S'pey 8 x 40)
The Buchan Eightsome (Reel 10 x 40)

Dinner with Haggis, neeps and tatties followed by sherry trifle
and copious alcohol.

Circassian Circle (Reel 10 x 32 Round the room)
Glasgow Highlanders (S'pey 8 x 32)
Duke of Perth (Reel 8 x 32 repeated)
Bratach Bana (Reel 8 x 32)
Glasgow Country Dance (Medley - 8 x (16S + 16 R))
Nottingham Lace (Reel 1 x 96 repeated at least once)
Bonnie Anne (Jig 1 x 96 repeated at least once)
Lord Maclay's Reel (Reel 4 x 40 repeated)
The Moray Rant (S'pey 3 x 48 repeated)
The Eightsome Reel (Reel 40 + (8 x 48) + 40)

Hearses at midnight!

Jim (and Marilyn)
:))))))

Killer programme

Message 11563 · Chris & Linda Gaul · 9 Apr 1998 02:06:43 · Top

Greetings!

An addition to Jim and Marilyn's killer programme.

One of my (un)favourite killer dances is The Diamond Jubilee - repeated, of course!

Linda
Pitlochry

Killer programme

Message 11573 · SMiskoe · 9 Apr 1998 15:14:40 · Top

I once played one of those killer programs. The mc was a young woman with
great stamina and she devised a program that had no repeat figures. When
someone asked her if she would do the same program when she was fifty she
couldn't understand the point of the question. To add to the problems, during
one of the later dances, the band managed to drop 8 bars about the 2nd round.
Neither of the mc's could tell us where the dancers were in the dance and the
sets below were so mixed up we had no idea where we were either. We played a
few more rounds and stopped.
Cheers,
sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

Killer programme

Message 11579 · Loren Wright · 9 Apr 1998 17:38:39 · Top

Just one criticism of Jim and Marilyn's program:

not enough 2-couple strathspeys (done 8x)!

Also, don't you think it's possible to kill with boredom?

Loren Wright <lorenw@rwp.mv.com>
Roger Wagner Publishing
Nashua, NH, USA

Killer programme

Message 11584 · Benjamin Stein · 9 Apr 1998 19:35:46 · Top

What-how could you omit John Drewry's Mic Mac Rotary, with encore of
course! And then again-following through on Priscilla's suggestion-Muirland
Willie in a seven couple set (maybe I should reconsider my remarks about
heart rate in that case).

Ben Stein
Burlington, Vt USA
dancers@Compuserve.Com

Killer programme

Message 11587 · Trans Vector Technologies, Inc · 9 Apr 1998 21:14:54 · Top

Hi folks,

What strikes me about Jim's killer program, and all the terriffic follow-up
suggestions, is that the program is designed to kill off everybody.

That is far to messy, and not very interesting for a murder mystery. What
is needed is something specific to the target individual. Perhaps the
murderer knows about a congenital defect in the murderee that is fatal for
a certain sequence of activities. Perhaps something that is triggered by
the specific sequencing of two dances (maybe even, nibbles eaten between
dances). Perhaps the murderer is two people who conspire to be the
murderee's partners for those two dances, to be sure that the specific
sequence is accomplished. If that sounds a bit lame, it is because I am not
a mystery writer. I will definitely keep my day job.

Cheers, Oberdan.

Trans Vector Technologies, Inc, 184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611
Phone: (805)484-2775, FAX: (805)484-2718, EMail: ootto@tvt.com

Killer programme

Message 11590 · Loren Wright · 9 Apr 1998 22:18:32 · Top

Following Oberdan's selective elimination idea:
Perhaps the victim could have an "Achilles Heel" that gets stepped on
(from an adjacent set) during the last circle of the Eightsome Reel?

Loren Wright <lorenw@rwp.mv.com>
Roger Wagner Publishing
Nashua, NH, USA

Killer programme

Message 11622 · Eric H. MacKay · 11 Apr 1998 08:09:24 · Top

Many people have ben coming up with killer programs, but I seem to be
seeing this as a mystery to be solved. For example, I think it was
Major Ian Stewart, with the Silver Tassie, in Neidpath Castle. Or was
it The Maid of Norway, with the Magic Wand, at Lock Leven Castle? This
could just be a big game of Clue. Tine

Killer programme (was Killer dance advice sought)

Message 11578 · Jennifer_Sawin · 9 Apr 1998 17:37:58 · Top

Jim, the program(me) is certainly a physical challenge, but let's be
certain to trash our grey matter as thoroughly as our muscles - how
about the Kelpie and Nighan Donn (pardon my spelling, I'm sure)? We
can be assured of being, if not exactly deceased, at least reduced to
a vegetative state.
Jenn

Killer programme (was Killer dance advice sought)

Message 11602 · Dan Latour · 10 Apr 1998 06:55:31 · Top

The_Healys wrote:
>
> Greetings!
>
> Having treated Missie's penultimate posting a little dismissively,
> Marilyn and I have just spent a pleasant evening over dinner
> composing a reply to the latest request for a killer programme.
> Missie's pre-condition that the "target" is a good dancer makes it
> easier in one way in that the Strathspeys automatically become
> demanding and enlisting the aid of the band leader to slightly
> SLOW the strathspeys and SPEED UP the jigs and reels would
> certainly help in achieving the objective.
>
> The suggested programme was done without any assistance from
> indices or databases but improvements are welcome:
>
> Petronella (Reel 8 x 32 - no warm up or Grand March)
> Braes of Breadalbane (S'pey 8 x 32)
> Airdrie Lassies (Jig 4 x 48 repeated)
> The Moving Cloud (Reel 8 x 32)
> The Silver Tassie (S'pey 8 x 32)
> Clutha (Hornpipe 4 x 48 repeated)
> Macdonald of Sleat (Jig 1 x 120 repeated at least once)
> Courage Reel (Reel 8 x 48)
> The Bonniest Lass in all the World (S'pey 8 x 40)
> The Buchan Eightsome (Reel 10 x 40)
>
> Dinner with Haggis, neeps and tatties followed by sherry trifle
> and copious alcohol.
>
> Circassian Circle (Reel 10 x 32 Round the room)
> Glasgow Highlanders (S'pey 8 x 32)
> Duke of Perth (Reel 8 x 32 repeated)
> Bratach Bana (Reel 8 x 32)
> Glasgow Country Dance (Medley - 8 x (16S + 16 R))
> Nottingham Lace (Reel 1 x 96 repeated at least once)
> Bonnie Anne (Jig 1 x 96 repeated at least once)
> Lord Maclay's Reel (Reel 4 x 40 repeated)
> The Moray Rant (S'pey 3 x 48 repeated)
> The Eightsome Reel (Reel 40 + (8 x 48) + 40)
>
> Hearses at midnight!
>
> Jim (and Marilyn)
> :))))))
>
> --
> The_Healys <The_Healys@compuserve.com>

Hello Again,
Thanks to all for the great and enthusiastic responses to my request
for a killer dance program. I say again, I'm quite new to SCDing and
can't quite empathize with all the possible fictional duress these
dances and combinations thereof may cause, however, I'm still
impressed by the number of suggestions and the confidence with which
they've been suggested, especially the program listed above. I would
point out, however, that because I am new to SCDing, someone???? will
have to demonstrate the above program and all the other evil twists
suggested so that I can get a first-hand observation to write about.
Hmmmmmn... Perhaps we'll have to get a workshop going for that very
purpose someday and it can then become a legendary event. I remain
confident though, despite my lack of SCD experience, that the
suggestions given are all truly wicked - wicked AND cruel - and that
I'm indeed among kindred souls.
Now - I've heard several friends say that they wish people wouldn't
waste so much time clogging up their mailboxes with frivolities when
they'd rather just talk about dancing. So, for those most respected of
my friends and fellow dancers, let's drop this and discuss more
serious matters.
So, how do we get used to dancing to pipes? That question didn't get
a whole lot of response.

Look Pleasant,
Missy

Killer programme (was Killer dance advice sought)

Message 11606 · Richard L. Walker · 10 Apr 1998 09:32:04 · Top

Ahhhh, I do think I heard my mother calling. Gotta go.
> I would point out, however, that because I am new to SCDing,
> someone???? will have to demonstrate the above program and all the
> other evil twists suggested so that I can get a first-hand
> observation to write about. Hmmmmmn... Perhaps we'll have to get a
> workshop going for that very purpose someday and it can then
> become a legendary event.

I try to play recordings that include both pipes and drums. The
pipes play 4 bars for the bow and curtsy; the drums come in for the
dance. Once the group gets used to the pipes / drums combination,
they are usually ready to be comfortable with the solo pipes.
> So, how do we get used to dancing to pipes?
Richard L. Walker
Pensacola FL (City of Five Flags) USA
rlwalker@granis.net

Killer programme (was Killer dance advice sought)

Message 11624 · JANGSTROM · 11 Apr 1998 17:11:07 · Top

I truly believe the " Linton Ploughman "should serve up "The Golden Pheasant"
somewhere during the evening!
(not in Boston, however!) Jane

Killer programme (was Killer dance advice sought)

Message 11647 · Anselm Lingnau · 15 Apr 1998 12:34:51 · Top

JANGSTROM <JANGSTROM@aol.com> writes:

> I truly believe the " Linton Ploughman "should serve up
> "The Golden Pheasant" somewhere during the evening!

Evening? If he did it during the daytime you could have a Linton
Ploughman's Lunch.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
No craftsman, if he aspires to the highest work in his profession, will accept
[inferior] tools; and no employer, if he appreciates the quality of work, will
ask a craftsman to accept them. --- Gerald Weinberg

Killer programme (was Killer dance advice sought)

Message 11627 · Malcolm and Helen Brown · 12 Apr 1998 00:22:24 · Top

Missy wrote:

> So, how do we get used to dancing to pipes? That question didn't get
> a whole lot of response.
>

You might try singing the tune that the pipes are playing as you dance,
(this is easier if it is a well known and obvious tune, such as Mairi's
Wedding).

After discussion with Duncan my son who has spent many
years hitting a drum behind a pipe band, he points out that what may
be causing a problem is the lack of space between the notes when played
on the pipes. (There is no gap between notes whem played on the pipes, as
there is a stream of air being continually pushed through the
reeds. Thus to make a distinction between the notes a grace note is played,
which is just another sound, and not a gap. That's the theory anyway, pipes
being the temperamental beasts that they are, do sometimes stop anyway
giving a gap between the notes, but thats a different story!)

When you clap out the rythm the hands come together on
the beat, but they have to separate to make a second clap - with a
piano the note is hit, gets quieter, and it or another is hit again,
producing a virtual, if not real, space. (He also says that many pipers
have a problem playing in strict tempo, but then he would!)

I mention the point about spaces between beats because we all know that
we should land on the beat - the problems are "how long is a beat?" and
"what do you mean by land, is it when the foot first comes into contact
with the floor, or when the head stops moving downwards?" - do I really
dance behind the beat, or is it that I keep moving while the note
is sounding?

Malcolm


--
_ _
|_|_ |_| Malcolm & Helen Brown (York UK) - m.brown@netcomuk.co.uk (Tir-Nan-Og)
_ |_|_
|_| _|_| Connecting via NETCOM Internet Ltd
|_|

Dancing to pipes, was Re: Killer programme

Message 11633 · Michael Hanson · 12 Apr 1998 22:48:38 · Top

On Fri, 6 Mar 1992, Malcolm & Helen Brown (York UK) wrote:

> Missy wrote:
>
> > So, how do we get used to dancing to pipes? That question didn't get
> > a whole lot of response.
> >
>
> You might try singing the tune that the pipes are playing as you dance,
> (this is easier if it is a well known and obvious tune, such as Mairi's
> Wedding).
>

If you are fortunate enough to have a piper, it may help to watch them
while they play. Often pipers will tap their foot to mark the beats,
especially when starting a piece. Watching them during the intro can help
you get in tune with where the beats are, and help you matching them up
with the music. Then, even when you can't see the piper you can keep
counting in your head.

Michael Hanson, Seattle, WA
michaelh@scn.org

Dancing to pipes, was Re: Killer programme

Message 11642 · Iain E. Garden Richardson · 14 Apr 1998 13:42:10 · Top

(Sorry if someone has already made this comment - I've missed a few
postings)

It may also help to listen to some recordings of pipers (probably
solo pipers are best if that's what you will be dancing to). This
should help you to develop an "ear" for pipe music and this in turn
will (I think) make it easier to find the beat when dancing to pipes.
There are some very interesting and innovative recordings out there,
e.g. Gordon Duncan's "Just for Seumas" and "The Circular Breath".
I agree, however, that the ideal is to have a "tame" piper who you
can dance to in an informal setting (where it doesn't matter if you
miss the beat!)

Cheers

Iain

Michael Hanson wrote:
>
> If you are fortunate enough to have a piper, it may help to watch them
> while they play. Often pipers will tap their foot to mark the beats,
> especially when starting a piece. Watching them during the intro can help
> you get in tune with where the beats are, and help you matching them up
> with the music. Then, even when you can't see the piper you can keep
> counting in your head.
>

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Iain E. Garden Richardson
Lecturer and researcher: Multimedia Communications
School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
The Robert Gordon University, Schoolhill, Aberdeen, Scotland, AB10 1FR
Telephone (0)(+44)1224 262428 Facsimile (0)(+44)1224 262444
Email i.g.richardson@rgu.ac.uk
World Wide Web http://www.eee.rgu.ac.uk/
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Dancing to pipes, was Re: Killer programme

Message 11653 · Dan Latour · 15 Apr 1998 20:54:53 · Top

Michael Hanson wrote:
>
> On Fri, 6 Mar 1992, Malcolm & Helen Brown (York UK) wrote:
>
> > Missy wrote:
> >
> > > So, how do we get used to dancing to pipes? That question didn't get
> > > a whole lot of response.
> > >
> >
> > You might try singing the tune that the pipes are playing as you dance,
> > (this is easier if it is a well known and obvious tune, such as Mairi's
> > Wedding).
> >
>
> If you are fortunate enough to have a piper, it may help to watch them
> while they play. Often pipers will tap their foot to mark the beats,
> especially when starting a piece. Watching them during the intro can help
> you get in tune with where the beats are, and help you matching them up
> with the music. Then, even when you can't see the piper you can keep
> counting in your head.
>
> Michael Hanson, Seattle, WA
> michaelh@scn.org

Hi Again,
I'm seeing a lot of great advice on keeping the beat to pipes.
Thanks. I think the problem that our class ran into, if I understand
correctly, and I hope I'll be forgiven if I've got this wrong, is not
that people can't get the beat but that there's no breaks in the beat
itself, or in the piping for that matter, so it doesn't give them a
starting point or a 'what comes next point' to listen for. I suggested
that if we just learn the whole dance we're supposed to be doing and
then do the whole thing without forgetting what comes next, there
wouldn't be a problem with not being able to hear musical changes that
would signal the next move(s). That's pretty much how performance
dancers get through in a pinch, before or even if they never learn
their music well. I'm sure this isn't the true SCD way to handle the
prob. though. But, at least we've already got the beat. If nothing
else, we can grin and set. Can anyone suggest possible solutions to
not being able to distinguish musical breaks that might identify
changes in the dance for those who don't feel comfortable with having
to simply know the whole dance well enough to just do it with the beat
and that's all?

Thanks,
Missy

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