Sore Ankles and Calves (was RE: 8x32 strathspeys (was New Recording Requests))

Pia Walker

Message 60729 · 11 Apr 2011 20:46:12 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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A lot of Scottish dancing is 'functional' where you can go on for hours and
hours. Ergonomically RSCDS style are not something that really should be
done for hours on end - as someone said we are not made to walk/run/hop on
our toes. If you take a full length ballet, dancers are not on their toes
as much as we think they are - there are stances - postures - etc, to 'rest'
the dancers who are much more trained than we are, from an early age, and
with better warm up techniques.

With regard to hips - It's a while ago since I did my ballet training, but
here goes - I think it has to do with the whole posture of the body - if you
stand in first position, bum in, tummy in, shoulders down, chin(s) up, knees
straight, ALL toes touching the ground - your pelvis will open out. And if
you keep up that stance, when rotating your leg in any direction, your
pelvis will have to open out and if you start young, your soft bones will
adjust to that - can give you other problems later on, but that's another
story, I suggest the bow leggedness will disappear with a straighten knee
:>).

Not much difference between SCD and Ballet here, but - we keep dancing to a
much later age, than any ballet dancer - start at later age these days, we
dance on floors that are not specially adapted to balletic workouts, and we
do not take really good care of our bodies in general.

I hear some saying: But we have always done so, so why shouldn't we do it
now correct - except now-a-days we are more sedentary in our lives - we sit
more, doing less daily routine exercise like walking to and from places etc,
there are fewer places with sprung floors, instead we dance on floors laid
over concrete bases, which makes our joints impact on something that doesn't
give.

Motorcyclist were made to wear helmets, because it became to dangerous to
drive faster cycles in more traffic than before, perhaps we need to rethink
what standards are worth upholding and find some new ones that can if not
save lives, then same the poor old joints.

Pia
Stir, Stir, Stir, Stir.

-----Original Message-----
From: Martin Sheffield [mailto:xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xxx]
Sent: 11 April 2011 18:19
To: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
Subject: Re: Sore Ankles and Calves (was RE: 8x32 strathspeys (was New
Recording Requests))

(Sorry! Start again)

> a simple set of travelling and setting steps
>
>> ... (rather than) ...turning out the leg at the hip.
>>
>
> Other than in setting steps, I have never understood the insitence on
> this aspect of posture.
>
Not only is it unnatural, I do not think bow-legged dancing can look all
that attractive. When setting from side to side, yes, point the toes and
knees in the direction of the movement, but when traveling forward? Charlie
Chaplin, anyone remember?

Has there at some time been confusion between turning out the knees on one
hand, and, on the other, turning out the foot so that you'll land on the
outer edge of the foot rather than the overworked big toe and ball?
Pointing the foot in this manner, does indeed turn the knees out somewhat,
but with the leg fully extended forward, the gait will not be Chaplinesque.
I feel emphasis should be on the positioning of the feet rather than other
parts of the lower limbs. Should be easier for the arthritic, too.
Martin

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