The Shepherd's Crook

Andrew Smith

Message 60248 · 21 Jan 2011 09:40:16 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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Thank you, Jan.

That was reassuring.

The discussion seemed to wander down some esoteric by-ways which while of
some interest were little help, other than to cause me to remember hearing
adult conversations along the lines of "They must have found another
tea-chest in Canada!" when yet another 'new' dance, probably more complex
than usual, was published. I think the 'origin myth' was that someone in
Canada had inherited/acquired a tea-chest full of papers from a Scots family
who had emigrated to Canada in the 19th century, and found that amongst them
were dance descriptions which were then being published.

Andrew Smith,

Bristol, UK.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jan Rudge" <xxx.xxxxx@xxxxxxx.xx.xx>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
Sent: Thursday, January 20, 2011 6:48 PM
Subject: RE: The Shepherd's Crook

> Reading the 'MacNab' book, 2007, the inference that I draw from the
> diagrams and the text is that the dance is performed facing the top of the
> room.

I have, on the odd occasion, seen The Shepherd's Crook on dance programmes
in London - always seems a bit weird to me but it's similar to having, say,
a Foursome on the programme, only less strenuous! On those occasions, as
there's no "audience" and it's not a performance as such, it's done with all
the sets facing the band/the top of the room, with the front sets up near
the top, roughly where the 1st couple of the top set would normally be. The
sets are unlikely to fill the room so there is always enough room to turn
round and dance towards the back of the hall per the instructions.

However it's also a regular part of our dem team's repertoire, and we tweak
it as required for any given room/occasion. Obviously we would position
ourselves to face as much of the audience for as much of the time as
possible, so it all depends where your audience is, and in particular
whether you have a "back" where there is no audience at all. We often miss
out the first 8 bars altogether, especially if the floorspace is restricted.
Otherwise, we might use the 8 bars to dance into position, or else dance
forwards and back instead. If space allows and we have two sets, we would
usually place them back-to-back or in an inverted V shape.

Regards,

Jan
Beaconsfield, UK
RSCDS London Branch

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