The Magazine's riddle: the solution

Anselm Lingnau

Message 58584 · 5 May 2010 01:08:04 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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Andrea Re wrote:

> What I am trying to say is that a certain perception
> of SCD gets reinforced (try and show the picture to your not SCD
> children or friends). It just depends what kind of image you want to
> project. There is a difference between being open to, say, older people,
> to being a pursuit that gets identified with grannies (a bit like
> bowling, even if I am sure a lot of youngsters do it)

Hm. This of course raises the question of which image *do* we want to project?
Looking at the covers of the magazines so far, the young people and kids are
in a definite majority. (There are a few covers displaying mixed-age groups
but there are just as many covers showing Scottish castles in various stages
of disrepair. I wonder what that is supposed to tell us.)

Of course it is a well-known technique in advertising to show young, good-
looking, visibly healthy and well-to-do people together with one's product
even if one is mostly trying to sell to older, etc. customers. This doesn't
work for everything (think »denture cleaner«) but at least SCD is
theoretically supposed to keep one young -- at heart, if not bodily --, so it
makes a certain amount of sense to go with the textbooks here. On the other
hand, it must be allowed to take a little risk every so often, so why not have
a picture of soldiers dancing? We could of course have had yet another
appropriately gender-balanced and ethnicity-balanced youth group on the cover
but in my opinion that would have been a *lot* worse.

> Anselm thought of the Reel of the 51st; kudos to him, but what do you
> think a casual onlooker is going to think?

In my case it's probably the Frankfurt SCD Club's fault, where men dancing
with other men are a phenomenon that is not exactly uncommon -- our XX/XY
chromosome ratio is almost 1:1, so sometimes the lasses are in the majority
and sometimes the lads. If a man dances with another man in Frankfurt it has a
lot more to do with otherwise not being able to dance at all than with their
sexual predilections in general, and I would presume that in an army camp in
Kandahar, like in Oflag VII-C, the situation is much the same.

With all possible respect, given this and also considering the fact that (as
others have commented already) being openly gay is not exactly a career
booster in the military -- it will get you kicked out in the US, although I
don't know about Britain --, Andrea's »casual onlooker« would have to be more
than somewhat homophobic to be offended by the cover in question. I'm fairly
sure that such people exist, but they are probably offended by so many things
that they wouldn't last very long in a dance class, anyway :^)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
[Sarah Palin's values] more resemble those of Muslim fundamentalists than they
do those of the Founding Fathers. On censorship, the teaching of creationism
in schools, reproductive rights, attributing government policy to God's will
and climate change, Palin agrees with Hamas and Saudi Arabia rather than
supporting tolerance and democratic precepts. What is the difference between
Palin and a Muslim fundamentalist? Lipstick. -- Juan Cole, *Salon*

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