Old Dance Interpretation

mlamontbrown

Message 57923 · 20 Jan 2010 21:09:41 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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I have recently been given a photocopy of a book containing two hundred country
dances.
The instructions use what I believe is called the long "s" -- i.e. it looks like an
"f", but the cross piece only extends on one side. Google would indicate that this
went out of fashion in the late 1700s / early 1800s.

Obviously the instructions are rather brief and not very clear - the music takes up
most of the page, with the instructions for the dance consisting of a few lines
underneath.

One of the phrases that is used in several of the dances is "cross over half figure"
- does anyone know what this means?

Similarly, there seem to be a number of dances which finish with "Right hand and Left
at Top", or "Right & Left at top" -- anyone any ideas?

There are a number of dances in the book which sound familiar, but don't look
anything like our dances (such as "Hamilton House"), and some others which look as if
they have some things in common ("Willie with his tartan Trues" starts with "Hey
Contrary sides / Hey on your Own sides")

Malcolm

Malcolm L Brown
York (UK)

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