Let's talk about strathspey transitions!

Rebecca Sager

Message 57599 · 11 Dec 2009 00:22:06 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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Thank goodness for Anselm and his common-sense approach! I was just thinking, oh Lord, there's something else to worry about - I've always danced, and even taught, that a strathspey Petronella figure involves two travelling steps and two setting steps. I do of course bring my foot up to the rear aerial position after the second step, as I do when changing direction in a circle.

When I took my prelim. exam, our tutor discussed the two methods of transition from setting to travelling, and the class agreed on the transition through first place, and the tutor said he would mention to the examiners that this was the way he had instructed us (whether the examiners liked it or not, I don't know)

Becky

Becky Sager
Marietta GA USA
"Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass...it's about learning how to dance in the rain." Marcy Shirley

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Anselm Lingnau <xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
To: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
Subject: Re: Let's talk about strathspey transitions!
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 2009 23:08:16 +0100

xxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx wrote:

> no it's not confusing al all if you consider: a St. Poussette containsall
> kinds of setting steps( to the side, diagonally forward, turningand
> backwards!)

Please explain how the »backwards setting step« on bar 8 of the strathspey
poussette differs from a retiring travelling step.

> The same for example is the Petronella in Tandem (Cherrybank
> Gardenscomes in mind) : setting step dioganally forward, turning and to
> theside.
>
> you only need to take care that you DO a setting step in touching the calf!
> otherwise it is transformed to a travelling step.

This is carrying it a bit far. The petronella turn in strathspey time involves
two steps, and if between the first and the second of those we are supposed to
bring the left foot up to 3rd rear aerial position that is news to me. And
this is before we even get into the observation that, in strathspey travelling
steps, an imaginary arrow starting at the back of your spine and pointing out
through your belly button usually points tangentially along the path on which
you're moving, while in strathspey setting steps it is at a right angle (i.e.,
normal) to that path. (Incidentally, as far as I'm concerned, this simple
mathematical truth kills the silly notion of the strathspey poussette
consisting of eight setting steps stone dead already. I love the smell of
analytical geometry in the morning.)

So the *first* step of the petronella turn is quite definitely not a setting
step. Even the Manual agrees with that; section 6.19 says »When danced in
strathspey time, the first step may be modified to become a travelling step«.
This presumably means that, according to the Manual, the second step is still
a setting step that, once more, is virtually indistinguishable from a
travelling step where, at the end, the dancer lifts up their foot into 3rd
rear aerial in preparation for the setting step that follows -- which judging
from this discussion people will do even when a formation is not claimed to
involve setting steps only (i.e., crossing over and setting as in »The Silver
Tassie« -- I think no one would disagree that the first two steps there are
*travelling* steps).

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
Most current certificate usage is best understood by replacing all occurrences
of the term »trusts« with »relies upon« or »depends upon«, generally with
an implied »has no choice but to ...« at the start. -- Peter Gutmann

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