strathspey setting step

Ian Brown

Message 57502 · 3 Dec 2009 15:07:14 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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I am indebted to all for much advice of a sartorial nature
but particularly to Lee and to one private correspondent who
have pointed out to me that what I always knew to be true
has certainly not been true since 1992.

I am somewhat ashamed to say that I have a copy of the 1992
manual on my bookshelf but was so confident of my knowledge
that I didn't even bother to check it. I am humbled!

Ian Brown
Harrogate Saltire Scottish Country Dance Club

-----Original Message-----
From: Lee Fuell [mailto:xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx]
Sent: 03 December 2009 13:28
To: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
Subject: Re: strathspey setting step

Ian,

Lots of responses to your question, but no answers - let me
try to rectify that.

The current version of the RSCDS Manual, issued in 2005,
makes no mention of different foot placement height for men
versus women on the lift at the end of the strathspey
setting step.

"With a soft hop on the right foot, draw the left foot
slowly up behind the right leg, knee well turned out, toe
just above the supporting heel and the side of the left foot
just against the back of the right leg."

As a beginning dancer, I was taught the same way you were -
men's feet higher than women's. I remember being told about
this change around the time the new manual was issued. I
expect there are a number of teachers out there who obtained
their certificates before 2005 who may not have noticed this
change.

So your adviser is technically correct. When I teach the
step, I teach it per the manual, but when teaching
experienced dancers I don't try to correct men who are doing
it the old way because we're only talking about a couple of
inches difference and I just don't think it's that big a
deal as long as the basic character of the step is intact.
If I have a male dancer who is jerking his foot up in an
abrupt or exaggerated way, trying to get it really high on
the back of his leg to the point where it makes what should
be a smooth movement look really awkward, I might address
that, but more because it's disrupting the rhythm of the
step than because of an inch or two of toe height.
Ultimately, unless you're an RSCDS teacher candidate or a
competitive festival dancer, I wouldn't advise worrying too
much about it.

I hope this clears things up for you,

Lee

RSCDS Cincinnati Branch
Beavercreek, OH, USA

-----Original Message-----
>From: Ian & Vicki Brown <xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx>
>Sent: Dec 3, 2009 4:33 AM
>To: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
>Subject: strathspey setting step
>
>I have been advised that my strathspey setting step is not
>correct. My adviser was at pains to point out that in the
>past it has been correct and that my setting hasn't
>noticeably changed. What he advised has changed is the
>definition of what is correct. Apparently the man is no
>longer to lift the foot any higher than the lady should.
>
>
>
>Without seeing my setting step, can anyone shed light on
>this story? Is my adviser correct or has he got hold of
the
>wrong end of the stick? Whether or not he is correct,
>should he be?
>
>
>
>I surmise that the lady has always been expected to set
less
>stridently since she might well be encumbered by a long
>gown. Ought I to conclude that kilts may be worn longer in
>this coming season?
>
>
>
>Ian Brown
>Harrogate Saltire Scottish Country Dance Club
>
>
>
>

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