Demo dance

Jim Healy

Message 48470 · 17 Apr 2007 02:41:41 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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Greetings!

James Tween has asked for dances where there is continuous movement. He has had answers that do not meet that criterion and some statements about standing still is dancing. I would ask what I consider a rather more pertinent question - why no stopping?

I had the privilege, and I mean that, of teaching the Dundee Branch technique class for four years. That class also provided the branch team for the Dundee non-competitive festival: non-competitive meaning you don't get marks and cups, all other definitions are merely coincidental. One of the best medleys I ever cobbled together included Glenlochar by Hugh Foss in which, at one point, all four couples stand still for two bars. The indrawn breaths from an audience of dancers who thought they had gone wrong and then 'wow' as they realised it was intentional was worth every hour of the practice sessions.

On topic, the next part of the medley was a neglected but brilliant strathspey by Harry Ways (of this list) where all four couples are moving for 64 bars: at the end of 32 bars they are all in reverse order on the opposite side of the set and then repeat the dance 'upside down' to get back to original places. This an absolute gem: danced crisply, the synchronised rondels are a joy. If you want to find it, to again pick up on a recent thread, it's Glendarroch Sheet 33.Jim Healy
Monaco and Perth

> From: xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx> To: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx; xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx> Date: Tue, 17 Apr 2007 01:34:06 +0200> Subject: Re: Demo dance> > James Tween schrieb:> > > OK, so my, perhaps inaccurate, choice of wording aside, my meaning still> > holds -- it's very hard to find a dance with continuous movement since even> > the dances mentioned so far have at least one person not moving at some> > point.> > Quite! But that's because natural selection tends to work against dances where > you're moving all the time, in favour of dances that give you some rest every > so often. And as I said, in social dancing there is nothing wrong with not > moving all the time -- although this doesn't help with the problem at hand.> > Anselm> -- > Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx> The big advantage of using a lightsaber, of course, is that you can both cut> and toast the bagel in one stroke. -- Marshall Brain, »How Lightsabers Work«

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