Macaronic

Alan Twhigg

Message 35516 · 11 Jun 2003 19:14:46 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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True, I was being a bit facetious in using this term, but from Ian's question, he clearly saw the title as French words not assimilated into English (as do I, a North American, who has heard of garden fetes or "fates", but hasn't encountered any on this side of the English-speaking divide).

-Alan Twhigg.

-------Original Message-------
From: Norma or Mike Briggs <xxxxxxxx@xxxxxx.xxx>
Sent: 06/11/03 09:08 AM
To: Strathspey list <xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
Subject: Macaronic

>
> Technically, of verse: containing Latin (or other foreign) words and
vernacular words with Latin or other terminations.

I think it's stretching the definition to say that "The Fete Champetre"
is macaronic. It's the title of a poem by Burns, and from the rhyming
scheme in the poem it's obvious that Burns didn't pronounce the phrase
in a French way. I'd hazard a guess that it was in fairly common use in
Burns's day. A fete used to be a common church fundraiser in England,
and the word was always pronounced "fate". Burns must have pronounced
it that way, and the second word as "shampetter," or something like that.

One could as well say that "The Rendezvous", or for that matter "The
Garage" or "The Omnibus," are macaronic, which they aren't because when
words are borrowed by English from other languages there comes a time
when they lose any semblance of foreign pronunciation and just melt into
the English vocabulary.

Mike
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