Oops, sorry, Edinburgh, not Edinborough!!!

Volleyballjerry

Message 34617 · 29 Mar 2003 21:58:26 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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Apologies to all Scots! My mind was pronouncing "Edinborough," and so my
fingers typed it quite literally, rather than "Edinburgh." * I caught the
error just a few seconds too late after sending!

Robb

In a message dated 03/29/2003 12:49:40 PM Pacific Standard Time,
Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx writes:

> Subj:Re: Elizabeth II, England, Scotland, et al.
> Date:03/29/2003 12:49:40 PM Pacific Standard Time
> From:<A HREF="mailto:Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx">Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx</A>
> Reply-to:<A HREF="mailto:xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx">xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx</A>
> To:<A HREF="mailto:xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx">xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx</A>
> Sent from the Internet
>
>
>
> It has always puzzled me that England and Scotland have separate soccer
> (football) teams, but this still seems very much an anomaly. Even in the
> Olympics there is no separate representation. For longer than the United
> States has even existed there has been no foreign embassy in Edinburgh*
> [now corrected], nor has Scotland (nor England separately for that matter)
> had embassies abroad, nor separate representation in any international
> political body, be it the League, the U.N., the E.U., or any such thing.
> Texas was for several years an independent nation, as was California very
> briefly, and Hawaii was once a
> fully independent monarchy. The original thirteen states were essentially
> independent of each other until the adoption of the Constitution.
> Louisiana
> statues are largely based upon Napoleonic Code rather than English Common
> Law, as even California's rather unique community property statute is based
>
> upon old Spanish and Mexican laws. But none of this by any means makes any
>
> of them a country today, any more than is Québec with its very different
> traditions from the rest of Canada nor the linguisitically differentiated
> Cantons of Switzerland one from the other. The components of the erstwhile
>
> Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia are now independent of each
> other and may rightfully be viewed as countries or nations, but they
> certainly were not so when those entities existed. When the flags of Saint
>
> George and Saint Andrew, rather than the Union Jack, fly at United Nations
> headquarters, then I will view England and Scotland as separate nations.
>
> Robb
>
> In a message dated 03/29/2003 12:13:00 PM Pacific Standard Time,
> xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xx.xx writes:
>
>
> > Subj:Re: Elizabeth II et al.
> > Date:03/29/2003 12:13:00 PM Pacific Standard Time
> > From:<A HREF="mailto:xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xx.xx">xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xx.xx</A>
> > Reply-to:<A HREF="mailto:xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx">xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx</A>
> > To:<A HREF="mailto:xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx">xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx</A>
> > Sent from the Internet
> >
> >
> >
> > Robb wrote:
> > It's clear that England and Scotland still exist as "countries"
> > in people's minds, even if they don't at all function as nations on the
> > international scene.
> >
> >
> > At all ????
> >
> > This afternoon Scotland beat Italy at rugby.
> > And as I type, England is playing Lichtenstein at football.
> >
> > Since when was the United Kingdom ever united in Sport or Dancing, not to
> > mention the legal, educational, and local government systems? We better
> > not
> > mention religion either....
> >
> > Fiona
> > expatriot Scot
> > Bristol
> > England
> >
> >
>
>

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