mispronouncing French

Andrew Smith

Message 32560 · 15 Nov 2002 08:50:23 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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I think "ashette" (for a large plate) is still in usage. I should have noted
them down at the time, but my father had a considerable list of
french-derived words that his mother used in everyday speech. I suppose a
wet-day trawl of the Scots Dictionary might be one way, or Donald might do
it as post-operative occupational therapy.
Andrew,
Bristol, UK.
----- Original Message -----
From: <XXXX9@xxxxxxxxx.xxx>
To: <xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
Sent: Wednesday, November 13, 2002 8:05 AM
Subject: Re: mispronouncing French

> Simple, they want to convey two messages:
> 1. When they travel abroad, they want to indicate
> that Scotland is not England, and
> 2. They want people in Scotland to think they are
> well traveled.
>
> Back to the original thread with a slight change of
> direction.
>
> Our dance terms that sound like ...
> jeté that sounds like a short dock, |JE-tee|
> coupé as |COO-pay|
> chasse [slip step] as |CHAH-see| but not as bad as
> the American |sa-SHAY|
>
> Other frenchisms in Scotland
> valet and buffet with the final "t" sounded
>
>

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