Gender benders

harvey

Message 3194 · 27 Nov 1995 02:26:03 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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Oberdan says:
>> I still think
>>that the limited, hands only, physical contact contributes to the sexually
>>non-threatening nature of SCD, which is my main thesis.
*************************************

Certainly people who are uncomfortable with physical contact find the
relative lack of it in SCD comforting. Those who wish are free to add
degrees of innuendo to glances, handing, phrasing, etc (partners,
corners, and politeness permitting). It is fascinating to watch the
variety of interactions in a single set.

The lack of touch can also be freeing. It is wonderful to watch
someone discover the power of fleeting eye contact, as in reels or
rights and lefts. And it can't be taught in most couple dances.

I remember being at a vintage dance workshop working on a tango. The
instructor (Richard Powers, must be seen to be believed) was not
teaching the full body contact style seen in competitions and movies,
but in the course of rotating partners I found a woman who insisted on
gluing her body to mine. I didn't get the sense that she "meant"
anything by it, that is just how she danced. But I walked away feeling
that the additional contact added nothing to the dance; that I felt
much more in tune with my partner in a light, firm ballroom hold.

Terry

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