Goss message / foreign-language diacritics

Loren Wright

Message 28570 · 1 Dec 2001 14:12:35 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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This is all very interesting... Apparently I missed the original,
troublesome Goss posting. However, I see all the accented characters in
both Jerry's and Anselm's postings (quoted below), presumably as they were
intended. The funny thing is that I'm using a Mac, and probably most of the
rest of you aren't! If I go to the character set item in my Outlook Express
Format menu, I see that "Western European (ISO)" is checked. (The other
choices include "Western European (Windows)", several foreign languages, and
a couple Unicode settings.) Since one of my programming tasks on my last
job was dealing cross-platform with a spell checker, I know that the actual
character codes for these accented characters are entirely different for Mac
and Windows!

For Mac folks out there who don't know, we have an easier way to enter these
characters: (Windows and Unix folk can tune out now.)

1. In your Apple menu there's an item called "Key Caps." This brings up a
window with a keyboard image. Each key has a character on it. Some of
these characters change as you press modifier keys like shift, option,
control and command. (What's an alt key?!!) If you find the character you
want, press that key and you'll see it appear in the field above the
keyboard. Some of the keys are enclosed with gray and show just the accent.
For these you use the combinations described below.

2. For instance to get a French e with an aigu accent, you hold down the
option key and press e. Nothing appears to happen, but when you press e
again, the é appears, or if you then press a, an á appears. If you hold
down option and press c, you'll get the ç immediately. If you need a German
umlaut, you first press option-u and then a u for ü, an a for ä, or i for ï.
If you do option-a, you'll get the å immediately, or option-s the ß
immediately. Some of the other combinations are more obscure. If you can't
remember what key does what, you can type in the Key Caps window, copy the
character you want, and paste it into your document.

It would be interesting to see how my characters appear on Windows and Unix
machines! (I'm sure I'll hear from some Win folks how complicated this is,
or asking where to find the option or command keys! Well
àèìùò`éáíúäëüïöçåîâîô⥵ñãõ to you!)

Loren Wright
Nashua, NH, USA

> Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx writes:
>
>> 128 for Ç, 129 ü, 130 é, 131 â, 132 ä, continue on yourself through
>> 165, and you'll see what you get, also 166 for ª 167 for º, 168 for
>> ¿, 171 for ½, 172 ¼, 173 for ¡, 174 for «, 175 for », 224 begins
>> Greek letters, of which 225 ß doubles for the German ess-tset.
>
> I don't know which encoding you're using -- your mail claims ISO-8859-1
> (also known as ISO-Latin-1) but the characters I see are all different.
> For example, on my machine (which is ISO-8859-1) Ç is 199 and ü is 252.
> Presumably you're typing your message in a different encoding and your
> mail client converts it to ISO-8859-1 when it is sent out. In
> particular, in vanilla ISO-Latin-1, like all the ISO-8859 encodings,
> positions 128 through 159 do not contain printable characters -- a fact
> that Microsoft, like usual, has seen fit to ignore because they wanted
> to get a bunch of extra characters in.

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