Lead up - which hand?

Harrison, Rosemary M

Message 28060 · 6 Nov 2001 21:19:22 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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Interesting. No, I don't actually have any book on this subject: it is just
the way I was taught to do early court dancing a long time ago (with the
woman's hand palm down on top of the back of the man's hand: and yes this
included the "reverence" now that you remind me). It is a hold which does
not permit much speed or abrupt change of direction without losing contact -
but then if you are wearing a massively heavy dress with a train I suppose
you are pretty slowed-down anyway! (I suspect it is extremely difficult to
reconstruct a relationship with present practice - not that that will deter
those of us who naturally ponder the historical roots of all that we do and
think.)
Rosemary

Rosemary M Harrison

-----Original Message-----
From: Patricia Ruggiero [mailto:xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx]
Sent: 05 November 2001 03:14
To: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
Subject: RE: Lead up - which hand?

Rosemary Harrison wrote:
"(Before that, I believe there was a very early version where both the man
and the woman had their palms facing down.)

Do you have a copy of Arbeau's _Orchesography_? The drawings are rather
naive. In two different places there are pictures of a couple executing the
"reverence" and it is obvious that the man and woman have nearer hands
joined. What's maddening is that in these quite simple drawings it is
impossible, to me at least, to tell the orientation of their hands. I had
always assumed that the man's palm faced upward, the woman's downward.
Following each of these there is a picture illustrating "pieds joints" (same
picture in both cases) -- and now that you mention it, I could almost make
the case that both those little hands have their palms facing downward, the
woman's hand seeming to be resting on top of the man's. The accompanying
text, explaining the dance figure, doesn't address the subject of the hands.

Pat

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