Dress Standards

Marilynn Knight

Message 24072 · 14 Dec 2000 19:37:28 · Variable-width font · Whole thread

Previous message: Dress Standards/snobbery (RuddBaron)
Next message: Dress Standards (Marilynn Knight)
Previous in thread: Dress Standards (RuddBaron)
Next in thread: Dress Standards (Marilynn Knight)

I fondly remember the year I lived in London for many reasons, but one
relevant to this discussion: When we attended evening concerts, no matter
the implied formality, the attendees were, metaphorically speaking, dressed
in everything from soup to nuts. And, clearly, those wearing jeans with
holes at the knee were probably the most erudite, most affluent. It was
such a liberating example! I always advise others to 'wear your mood'.
Isn't that what 'egalitarian' is about? If you are polite and neither
smelly or obscene, whose business is it anyway?

Marilynn Latta Knight
In Foggy, Foggy South Carolina(interpret the fog any way you like).

-----Original Message-----
From: M Sheffield [mailto:xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xx]
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2000 2:50 AM
To: xxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxxxxxx.xxx-xxxxxxxxx.xx
Subject: Re: Dress Standards

Graham wrote:
>
>... consider the
>probable temperature before deciding upon a dress-code. ...
> Summer dances tend to be less formal and people dress
>accordingly.

Can't say I remember evedr feelng too hot in 'summer' in GB, though I
certainly have sweated in winter when the heating was on and the windows
closed.

Even worse in USA, where I remember shivering at 17 C indoors in summer,
and at 27 C in overheated interiors in winter. Outside, of course, it was
just the opposite, so I felt permanently under- or over-dressed (as regards
quantity rather than style, I should add).

Much of Britain is pretty relaxed as far as dress is concerned, I think*,
and rightly so when a popular social pastime is involved. It is a pity to
exclude anyone from dancing either through a rigid dress code or by
over-priced events. Why is it that people have to be told what to wear?
Isn't there something wrong when someone can be made to feel uncomfortable
if not wearing a uniform?
  Conforming to dress codes does not mean that we have joined the ranks of
the upper classes (who like to be distinguished), it merely means we are
aping them -- or rather, aping them as they used to be in times gone by.

( * at least, I thought so, until my son came home after two years at
university in GB ... wearing a TIE ! Perhaps I have been in France too
long)
Martin,
 in Grenoble, France.

 http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/scd.htm
                  (dance groups, some new dances ...)

--
M Sheffield <xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xx>

Previous message: Dress Standards/snobbery (RuddBaron)
Next message: Dress Standards (Marilynn Knight)
Previous in thread: Dress Standards (RuddBaron)
Next in thread: Dress Standards (Marilynn Knight)
A Django site.