Balance vs. Set in Lines

Richard Goss

Message 23224 · 25 Oct 2000 20:18:31 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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Rebecca,

I think you have been missing the point in part of this
discussion.

In examples already given, the Society has already
(inconsistantly) been replacing "balance" with "set" when
they have re-issued their books. They have already printed
new dances with what used to be call "balance" with the word
"set".

All I have been saying, is that this idea of the Society is
a good one which would be better if they consistantly
followed it through.

The entire concept of a balance in strathspey is impossible
because it is impossible to properly perform the setting
step and still maintain hands. To cite WYJTD, "balance ...
occurs in reel time only". So in the Society's mind a
strathspey balance would be impossible.

Your own confusion (and the Society's) is implicit in your
statement. "Balance in line", in WYJTD is a formation, but
everywhere, including nonRSCDS Scottish dancing in Scotland,
balancing is a non-pas-de-basque setting step.

The confusion was caused by the Society's continued lack of
consistancy.
"Balance in line" 1st appears in "Scottish Reform"
Book 3.1 (1926, cont. at least until 1950 edition)
3&4 7&8 Balance meaning set (2 pas-de-basques)
Somewhere between the 1950 edition and the 1964 edition
the Society decided to change balance for set
(probably because:
A. the RSCDS does not balance here, and
B. everyone else does balance here and the
Society wants them to stop (Reel 51st, esp.)
So in Book 3.1 (1964->) 3&4/7&8 now say set.
(because that is what we are doing here)

Unfortunately WYJTD still uses "Scottish Reform" (which now
contains no mention of a balance), as an example of a
balance in line.

To my knowledge, John Drewry never had any official status
with the Society until after Miss Milligan's death. So maybe
no one told him about the change when it was made.

The late Milt Levy was my student, who, comming from
international folk dancing and the EFDSS, never did get
along well with RSCDS terms.

To have a reasonable discussion, it is not sufficient to
find exceptions (I have already said that the Society has
been inconsistant in this), what you must do is
answer/explain the facts presented by the person with whom
you are disagreeing. I am not fortunate enough to have met
and polled the majority of dancers (which sounds like, "Mon,
all the kids are ...." in which case an intelligent mother
will say, "Tell me their names and I'll call their
mothers."). I would be willing to consider your comments as
relevant when you can respond to, or explain mine.

------

Goss
xxxxxxx.x.xxxx@xxx.xxx

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