Transforming between Strathspey and Quicktime (was The Wind on Loch Fyne)

Oberdan Otto

Message 21758 · 29 Jun 2000 22:19:59 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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>[Todd:] The Baton Rouge LA group once tried doing this dance in reel
>time. We didn't make it - the figures must have been written with
>slow time in mind, because in fast time we could not dance fast
>enough to finish in place!
>
>It was strange as a lot of strathspeys can be done in quick time, but not
>this one.

A lot depends on how you do the transformation. For example, turn BH
in Strathspey translates most directly to turn BH using skip change
(not PdB). Also, from a body dynamics point-of-view, Common
Schottishe (simple Strathspey Setting) translates most directly to
slip-to-the-right, then slip-to-the-left, not PdB setting. Anything
in quicktime with PdB basically puts the brakes on the movement. Many
of the movements in this dance rely on the smooth transitions
afforded by the particular Strathspey steps that are used. Setting
with PdB in quicktime has no analog in Strathspey time.

AND, of course, circling with a Strathspey travelling step translates
most directly to circling using skip change. That would seem like a
very odd translation given that slip step works so well for circles
in quicktime. Well, it turns out that the Strathspey travelling step
doesn't really work that well for circling in Strathspey time anyway.
However, circle to the left in quicktime translates most directly to
Strathspey time as Set to the left(ah), Set to the left(ah), Set to
the left(ah), Set to the left, which is not difficult once you get
the hang of it and requires none of the body contortions we force
upon ourselves using the travelling step. It seems doubtful that
Strathspey circles were actually originally done with a travelling
step.

***(ah = a subtle transitional movement with no lift behind).

By the way, if you are eager to do a triangular dance in quicktime
you might have a go at the Celtic Brooch (Foss). Great fun and very
challenging!

Cheers, Oberdan.

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