Keel Row

Graham Mackenzie

Message 21642 · 24 Jun 2000 13:01:11 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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Actually this is a North Country (Tyneside) song, originally published in=20
1863; a sperb performance is the one by Kathleen ferrier.

In addition to the generalised and poetic use for "boat, ship", using=20
metonymy/synecdoche, a "keel" was a specific type of boat in that area, a=
=20
flat-bottomed lighter for transferring coal to ships at anchor

(Oxford English Dictionary:
1. A flat-bottomed vessel, esp. of the kind used on the Tyne and Wear for=20
the loading of colliers; a lighter.
The name is or has been in local use in the east of England from the Tyne=20
to the Norfolk Broads; it has also been used in U.S. locally both for a=20
river and a coasting vessel. The old keel which brought coal from the upper=
=20
Tyne to ships in the harbour at Tynemouth was carvel-built and had a square=
=20
sail, as well as a heavy oar worked by three keel-bullies. The existing=20
keel is clinker-built and used only for riverside traffic. See R. Oliver=20
Heslop in N. & Q. 9th Ser. VII. 65=AD6.

Row: Of a boat or other vessel: To move along the surface of water by=20
means of oars. )

Happy sailing, as well as dancing!

Graham Mackenzie
Doocot Lodge 7 Doocot Road St Andrews Fife KY16 8QP
Tel: 01334 475604
Mobile: 0777 607 4442=20
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<html>
Actually this is a North Country (Tyneside) song, originally published in
1863; a sperb performance is the one by Kathleen ferrier.<br>
<br>
In addition to the generalised and poetic use for &quot;boat, ship&quot;,
using metonymy/synecdoche,&nbsp; a &quot;keel&quot; was a specific type
of boat in that area, a flat-bottomed lighter for transferring coal to
ships at anchor&nbsp; <br>
<br>
<b>(Oxford English Dictionary</b>:&nbsp; <br>
<font face=3D"Plantin OUP" size=3D4 color=3D"#FF0000"><b>1.
</b></font><font face=3D"Plantin OUP" size=3D4>A flat-bottomed vessel, esp.
of the kind used on the Tyne and Wear for the loading of colliers; a
lighter. <br>
The name is or has been in local use in the east of England from the Tyne
to the Norfolk Broads; it has also been used in U.S. locally both for a
river and a coasting vessel. The old keel which brought coal from the
upper Tyne to ships in the harbour at Tynemouth was carvel-built and had
a square sail, as well as a heavy oar worked by three keel-bullies. The
existing keel is clinker-built and used only for riverside traffic. See
R. Oliver Heslop in <i>N. &amp; Q</i>. 9th Ser. VII. 65=AD6. <br>
<br>
Row:&nbsp; Of a boat or other vessel: To move along the surface of water
by means of oars. )<br>
<br>
</font>Happy sailing, as well as dancing!<br>
<br>
<br>
<div>Graham Mackenzie</div>
<div>Doocot Lodge&nbsp;&nbsp; 7 Doocot Road&nbsp;&nbsp; St
Andrews&nbsp;&nbsp; Fife&nbsp;&nbsp; KY16 8QP</div>
<div>Tel:&nbsp; 01334 475604</div>
Mobile:&nbsp; 0777 607 4442=20
</html>

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