Polite Turns

Trans Vector Technologies, Inc

Message 19156 · 30 Oct 1999 01:25:31 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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>THAT PULL-AND-PUSH THAT FORCES MY "POLITE TURN" AFTER R+L CAN HURT, THOUGH!

Yes, one of my hot buttons. Forcing a Polite Turn is never necessary and is
never welcome.

I teach my dancers that one should NEVER force another person to do a
polite turn. The polite turn is something the turnee does for him/herself.
The other dancer can provide a firm arm against which the turnee can push,
but even that is not necessary. Forcing the polite turn can throw the other
dancer off balance or, if s/he did not intend to do a polite turn, could
cause an unpleasantly twisted arm.

For example, the "natural" ending position after the last left hand in
Rights and Lefts is for W1 and M2 to be facing in and for M1 and W2 to be
facing out. The Polite Turn, then, is a final left pivot for M1 and W2 to
face in. Assuming the dancers are moving toward that "natural" end, they
already have leftward turning momentum, so adding a half left pivot takes
very little effort, especially if the other dancer just provides a firm arm
against which to push and balance. The action of the Polite Turn becomes
even easier if both dancers make a point of continuing to look at each
other until both are facing across the set.

Cheers, Oberdan.

Trans Vector Technologies, Inc, 184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611
Phone: (805)484-2775, FAX: (805)484-2718, EMail: xxxxx@xxx.xxx

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