Buzz Spins in 1783?

Priscilla M. Burrage

Message 17819 · 29 Jun 1999 20:36:34 · Fixed-width font · Whole thread

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On Tue, 29 Jun 1999, Miriam L. Mueller wrote:

> Regular swing not until after WWII? I was taught the "classic" swing when
> I was a child in the late "30's and early '40's, by adults who did it
> that way.

I surrender. I learned square dancing from people who came out of the
hollows to dance once a week. We did not take our partners in ballroom
position and propel ourselves round each other with nearer (right)
feetside by side and outer feet (left) making a paddling motion to move us
round each other. Instead we used the same hold, but we picked up each
foot in turn and "walked" in a little circle round each other.

> In 1945 I remember attending a village square dance (western Mass.,
> Berkshires) where the buzz swing was done by everyone. Since you're in
> that neighborhood and report the walk-around swing, we're probably honing
> in on the start of buzz-swing popularity.

I grew up on the western side of the Catskills, the northmost section of
what we call Appalachia (= been poor since the eighteenth century).
That's one mountain range and wide river from your western Mass.

> I learned my square dancing in
> NYC, so it might have started near there - as a "twiddle?"

A wild guess on my part: it came about because some square dancers went
to a folk festival and saw another ethnic culture doing the footwork.
That certainly is how the hand-on-wrist hands across (star) started.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(xxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxx)

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